Apply to be a Coral Fellow!

 Looking for a job that will provide solid hands-on resource management experience? Working towards building your career in natural resource management related to coral reefs in your own community?  Want to be part of the next generation of coral reef conservation leaders? Apply to be a Coral Fellow today!

The Coral Reef Fellowship Program seeks to build the next generation of coral reef conservation leaders and supports two-year positions that strive to address current capacity gaps, as well as build long-term management capacity in the jurisdictions by placing highly qualified individuals whose education and work experience meet each jurisdiction’s specific coral reef management needs.

The National Coral Reef Management Fellowship Program is a partnership between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Coral Reef Conservation Program, the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Office of Insular Affairs, the U.S. All Islands Coral Reef Committee and Nova Southeastern University’s Halmos College of Natural Sciences and Oceanography.

The seven jurisdictions where fellows will be placed include: the U.S. Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Florida, Hawai’i, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and American Samoa. The start date for the two-year positions is January 2018.

Each position has its own distinct work plan specific to jurisdiction management needs and provides training and professional development opportunities. Project work will focus on climate change, land-based sources of pollution and fishing impacts to coral reef ecosystems. Fellows may also work to address local needs such as the development of
management plans for marine managed areas, engagement of stakeholders in resource management, and development of climate change adaptation plans.

The deadline for applications is July 11, 2017.

Please visit http://cnso.nova.edu/fellows/apply.html to access application instructions.

Qualified candidates meeting stated educational requirements with relevant work experience are encouraged to apply. SCUBA diving will not be permitted as part of job duties and applicants must be a U.S. citizen or U.S. permanent resident. Applicants need to have completed posted educational requirements by December 2017 and may apply to multiple jurisdictions.

For additional information or questions, please contact coral.fellowship@noaa.gov.

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AIC Chair’s Report, Sept 2016: Priorities, updates, challenges, & accomplishments

aic-chairs-rpt-sept-2016-photos

by Carey Morishige Martinez, Executive director, AIC Secretariat

The U.S. All Islands Coral Reef Committee (AIC) is still in the Marianas (until Saturday) participating in the 36th U.S. Coral Reef Task Force (USCRTF) Meeting, but wanted to share with you some of what’s been happening since the AIC last met in February 2016.

In the Marianas, warming waters have already caused coral reef bleaching–for yet another consecutive year. Florida continues to deal with an unprecedented coral disease outbreak. And, in other jurisdictions grounded vessels, invasive species, and land-based pollution impacts, to name a few, continue.

For the AIC, strengthening federal-jurisdiction integration and partnerships, the Coral Reef Management Fellowship Program, and Coral Reef Conservation Act (of 2000) reauthorization remain top priorities.

Now, more than ever, it is critical that we continue to work together to make a positive difference for our coral reefs.

Towards that end, the approval at the 36th USCRTF Meeting of two very important documents (“U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Strategy, FY2016-2021” and “U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Watershed Partnership Initiative Strategy”) is a huge accomplishment and the AIC is proud to have helped build both documents.

For more information and details, check out the newest AIC Chair’s Report presented at the 36th USCRTF Meeting in the Marianas.  

Read through it here or download it here.

Kids in American Samoa: Fighting stormwater runoff, one rain garden at a time!

By guest AIC blogger, Sabrina Woofter, Coral Reef Management Fellow, American Samoa Coral Reef Advisory Group

Le Tausagi Rain Garden, American Samoa

The Le Tausagi summer camp admires their completed rain garden!  Photo credit: Coral Reef Advisory Group

Le Tausagi Rain Garden

A camper prepares to plant ti. Photo credit: Coral Reef Advisory Group

Le Tausagi, an outreach group comprised of staff from American Samoa environmental and youth agencies, held their annual Enviro Discoveries Summer Camp on July 14th and 15th, 2016. Throughout the 2-day event, about 30 children and 15 staff and volunteers discussed local natural resources and the impacts that humans have on them. As the  Coral Reef Management Fellow, I used a watershed model to explain how we can help protect the coral reef ecosystem by preserving and planting vegetation in our watersheds and reducing land-based sources of pollution.

Le Tausagi Rain Garden

Campers and staff are working hard to plant, water, and mulch. Photo credit: Coral Reef Advisory Group

The camp culminated with an installation of a 600 ft2 rain garden that now captures stormwater runoff from an adjacent basketball court and rooftop. The garden was installed at a public park located in the impaired Nu’uuli Pala Lagoon watershed. Rain gardens like this one are stormwater best management practices (BMPs) that use plants, mulch, and soil in a depression to slow down and clean stormwater runoff, letting it infiltrate the ground. Stormwater contributes to poor surface water quality and often contains pollutants, such as sediment and nutrients, that can damage coral reef ecosystems. Rain gardens are one type of practice that can be used along with others to help improve water quality and the health of coral reefs.

New Tools Help in Ridge-to-Reef Watershed Management

Hot of the presses from the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force are two new tools to help in effective watershed management from ridge-to-reef!

[modified from the NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program website]

Priority-Ecosystem-Indicators1) Priority Ecosystem Indicators:
The first is a series of ecological indicators and measurements to evaluate the success of existing watershed management efforts. The indicators look at coral communities, as well as sediment and water quality. Nearly all were selected from existing national-scale monitoring efforts by federal agencies.

 

Pages from FINAL_Programmatic_Checklist_version_2_10.22.152) Programmatic Checklist:
The second is a user-friendly checklist
that walks watershed coordinators through a series of questions to help them implement a successful ridge-to-reef watershed management plan. The checklist helps gauge support from stakeholders–including local groups and federal agencies–and documents overall progress as a ridge-to-reef watershed management plan is implemented. The checklist is meant to be completed on an annual basis to track progress.

You can download them both at http://www.coris.noaa.gov/activities/uscrtf_watershed_tools/.

AIC Chair’s Report: Priorities, updates, challenges, & accomplishments

AIC Chair's Report - Feb 2016

by Carey Morishige Martinez, Executive director, AIC Secretariat

In the three months since the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force last met, efforts to conserve and manage our coral reefs have continued. Thankfully, the winter season brought cooler waters and a much needed reprieve for our coral reefs, many of which have suffered back-to-back years of bleaching. However, in areas like southeast Florida, the number of corals impacted by an unprecedented disease event continues to grow and the cause(s) of the disease has yet to be identified.

Coral bleaching from warming oceans, ocean acidification, Crown of Thorns Starfish outbreaks, ship groundings, coral disease outbreaks, invasive algae, land-based sources of pollution, and so many other things impact our coral reefs each day.

We must stretch beyond the ‘status quo’ and work together, as federal agencies and jurisdictions, to make a difference NOW.

AIC Chair's Report, Feb. 2016At each biannual U.S. Coral Reef Task Force (USCRTF) meeting, the AIC Chair presents a report of AIC priorities, challenges, and accomplishments in every AIC jurisdiction and the Freely Associated States since the previous Task Force meeting. Check out the newest AIC Chair’s Report presented at the 35th USCRTF meeting in Washington D.C.  

Read through it here or download it here.

 

2015 CNMI Coral Reef Initiative Summer Interns’ Conservation Messages

By AIC guest bloggers, Britta Baechler, CNMI Marine Protected Areas Coordinator, Division of Fish and Wildlife and Avra Heller, CNMI Coral Reef Initiative Project Coordinator, Bureau of Environmental and Coastal Quality

We had a great time this summer with the 2015 Coral Reef Initiative internship participants! This summer 14 interns held various positions with CNMI Division of Fish & Wildlife (DFW), CNMI Bureau of Environmental and Coastal Quality’s (BECQ) Division of Coastal Resources Management (DCRM), Micronesia Islands Nature Alliance (MINA), CNMI Department of Lands and Natural Resources (DLNR), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) learning about the various ways our government and partners work to protect CNMI’s precious natural resources.

Check out this fun video of the Coral Reef Initiative (CRI) intern cohort (and CNMI Micronesia Challenge Young Champion, Carey Demapan) during a field trip to the Managaha Marine Conservation Area! How many of these bright young CNMI stars do you know or recognize?

The video was compiled and edited by CRI intern Romana Chong. Original song written and performed by Nikkie Ayuyu.

 

2015 CRI SUMMER INTERNS:

  • Delfin Camacho – Worked with DCRM Enforcement, monitoring enforcement and compliance of permitted projects and marine sports activities.
  • Miso Sablan and Andrew Johnson – Conducted reef flat surveys looking for signs of coral disease with the CNMI Marine Monitoring Team based at BECQ.
  • Nikkie Ayuyu and Anathalia David – Conducted marine debris education outreach and research, with MINA, a key partner NGO.
  • Erick Dela Rosa and Max Garcia – Worked with the DLNR Sea Turtle team conducting nest surveys and monitoring as well as in-water live capture and tagging of sea turtles.
  • Kallie O’Conner, Jacklyn Garote, Romana Chong – Designed and assisted in implementation of various Marine Protected Areas (MPA) education and outreach strategies, with the MPA Coordinator based at DFW.
  • Austin Piteg and Mary Fem Urena – Worked with the CNMI NOAA field office staff conducting water quality and seagrass monitoring along the length of the Saipan lagoon.
  • Eric Cepeda and Ian Iriarte – Worked with DFW fisheries department on various fishery biology and tourist – interaction projects.