YOU Can Help Prevent Coral Bleaching

by Carey Morishige Martinez, Executive director, AIC Secretariat

Molokini Coral Bleaching Media Clips. Credit: Hawaii DLNR

Bleached coral at Molokini Crater, Hawaii (10/9/15, Hawaii DLNR).

You’ve probably seen the many articles about coral bleaching the last few months (Google News search: ~103,000 results!). Just last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) declared the third global coral bleaching event on record…THIRD…EVER.

If you’re thinking “this can’t be good,” you’re right. But don’t lose hope!

Quick Side-bar:
Coral bleaching is…”When corals are stressed by changes in [ocean] conditions such as temperature, light, or nutrients, they expel the symbiotic algae living in their tissues, causing them to turn completely white.” (NOAA website)

Can corals recover from bleaching? YES. But, if bleaching lasts a long time, the coral usually dies. Interested in learning more? Check out our post and get the 4-1-1 on coral bleaching!

If you’re like me, you’ve asked yourself, “so what can I do?” There’s A LOT that we can do!

I really like this easy and straightforward list from The Nature Conservancy.

  1. Conserve water –> less runoff and wastewater
  2. Help reduce pollution –> less greenhouse gases= less ocean warming
  3. Use only organic fertilizers –> less pollution going into the ocean
  4. Dispose of your trash properly = no marine debris!
  5. Support reef-friendly businesses
  6. Plant a tree –> less greenhouse gases= less ocean warming
  7. Practice safe and responsible diving and snorkeling –> not touching or anchoring on corals = happier corals!
  8. Volunteer for a coral reef cleanup
  9. Contact your government representatives
  10. Spread the word!

We need our coral reefs.

Why? Check out these facts (International Coral Reef Initiative):

“…healthy coral reefs provide:

  • Habitat: Home to over 1 million diverse aquatic species, including thousands of fish species
  • Income: Billions of dollars and millions of jobs in over 100 countries around the world
  • Food: For people living near coral reefs, especially on small islands
  • Protection: A natural barrier protecting coastal cities, communities and beaches
  • Medicine: The potential for treatments for many of the world’s most prevalent and dangerous illnesses and diseases.”

Coral reefs are amazing. We need them and need to work together to make sure they’re around for future generations.

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